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   Domestic violence is common in Australia - in fact 1 in 4 teenagers have seen an incident of physical violence by one parent towards another
(Young People and Domestic Violence, National Crime Prevention, Attorney-General's Department, Canberra, 2001).


 In Australia in 2001-2002, there were 137,938 situations of child abuse reported to the government child protection services
(Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2002), Child Protection Australia 2001-02, Canberra, 2002).
A national survey of adults found that physical abuse before the age of 15 was experienced by 10 per cent of women and 9.4 per cent of men. Of those people, 56 per cent were physically abused by a father or step-father, and 26 per cent were abused by a mother or step-mother.
The same survey found that sexual abuse before the age of 15 was experienced by 12 per cent of women and 4.5 per cent of men. Of those people, 30 per cent were abused by a male relative.
(Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006), Personal Safety Survey Australia 2005, Cat. no.4906.0, ABS, Canberra)


 Most often, domestic violence is by men towards women. For example, in Victoria in 2000-01, of the 21,622 family violence incident reports made to police, almost 80% of the victims were female, while 80% of the defendants were male
(Victoria Police Crime Statistics, 2000-01, Victoria Police, 2002).


 In an Australian survey, almost two-thirds of teenagers who lived in families where one parent was abusing the other had told someone about it. The main people they told were friends, other family members who didn't live with them, or an older adult friend. Some had rung police, or called a support service
(Young People and Domestic Violence, National Crime Prevention, Attorney-General's Department, Canberra, 2001).


 People with disabilities are sometimes abused by the very people who care for them. Often this is a family member. Because they rely on this carer, they can find it very hard to get help
(It's Not OK. It's Violence. Information about Domestic Violence for Women With Disabilities, Partnerships Against Domestic Violence, Canberra).
Click here to download a 5-page fact sheet on Young People Living With Family Violence (pdf file). It looks at the research, how violence affects young people, whether there is any evidence of an inter-generational 'cycle' of violence, and how services can respond.

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